Retirement time in France! opinions!!!

Ok so today I come to you on a non travel related subject ,really; it could be too lol! Well , my dear readers and travel buddies, I am getting to that age, yes the golden egg or whatever, and its time to think about retirement!!

I am in in what could could be my last full year of my working life per se. Not that I would not continue to dabble in consulting work later on, but to finally get my retirement benefits and start enjoing time and travel even better or at least I hope.

So let me give some light into the subject in my belle France. As the minimum retirement age is 62 years, it is important to anticipate and wonder which French cities are the most accessible or offer the most enjoyable living environment. The cities of the west of France and especially of the southwest have achieved better scores than their eastern municipalities, in particular thanks to air quality, safety and overall lower fixed expenditure. Limoges exceeds with one head all its sisters thanks in particular to its security and its pleasant living environment. It has therefore distinguished itself as the ideal destination to retire. Le Mans and Nice close the podium .

Some of the most mention areas of my France for retiremet heavens are the Var department as one of the most adored places of the elderly who wish to enjoy the Mediterranean climate that bathes this department of the region Provence-Alpes-Côte d’azur. The Charente-Maritime is also a destination that pleases seniors, interested in its vast seaside and the beauty of its landscapes. New retirees who don’t like big cities will enjoy it. This department is appreciated for the quality of its living environment and for the dynamism of its cities (Montpellier, Agde, Béziers, etc.), but also for the charm of its small communes located on the periphery. The Hérault is endowed with many infrastructures specially set up for the elderly. The Alpes-Maritimes is the ideal place to spend a peaceful retreat in the sun. This department houses large cities like Nice, Cannes, Antibes and Menton,

And of course, my own neck of the woods is showing up right up there, hint hint!! The Morbihan (Brittany) is also interested in a large number of retirees who appreciate the authenticity and beauty of its typically armoricaines landscapes. With vibrant, human-sized cities such as Lorient and Vannes, this is the ideal destination for those who no longer want to live in the big cities. Its rich history and cultural life are suitable for many seniors. The map below show in red the most wanted places to retire and in blue places people are leaving elsewhere!

 

Security, access to care, Estimation of the cost of living;  Estimated from 4 weighted sub-criteria: The average price of m², the housing tax, the water price, the garbage disposal fee.  The quality of public transport ,Cultural offer with criterion: The number of museums, the number of theatres and places of culture, the number of active cinema screens, the number of festivals; Potential access to an active social life, the living environment. According to these criteria the best are: Limoges, le Mans, Nice, Bordeaux, Perpignan, Saint-Étienne, Caen, Nancy, Angers, Clermont-Ferrand, Grenoble;  Dijon Marseille Aix-en-Provence; Metz ,Tours, Toulouse, Reims, Brest, Rouen, Lyon, Montpellier, Nîmes, Nantes, and Rennes.

And if even want to spread our wings and go retire at a pleasant place here the scores are high on Portugal, Morocco… and Florida(USA) lol!!! it is retirement USA heavens for sure. But Spain, Malta or Italy can be an interesting options to retire abroad as well of course.

So there, gave you some thoughts now is your turn to give me yours please. I like this post to be more than just glitter photos and travel anecdotes but a working post where you can help me decide. Its your only chance to there take it and go for it. And I thank you.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

13 Comments to “Retirement time in France! opinions!!!”

  1. Exciting times ahead. We love the Charente-Maritime and spend a few days the every summer. My in-laws looked for a house in that area before settling for Portiragnes in the Herault, where we are going on Sunday for our half-term break. I love it there because of the Mediterranean Sea and its proximity to Spain, only a couple of hours away. I’d choose Europe over the USA any day on account of its gun laws and poor social securiry care. You have plenty of time to decide, but I assume you wouldn’t like to be too far from your sons.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. i’d like to retire in Portugal. in the country, where things are quiet – portuguese being my mother tongue (though i was born and raised in Brazil)
    South France, i hear is a nice place too…. alas, i get ahead of myself, i’m still 34 years old.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Well I think you already know my answer. I’m past the French retirement age and happily living on the Cote d’Azur.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I used to think I would like to retire to a different country but BREXIT will probably put a stop to that!

    Like

  5. Reblogged this on Paris1972-Versailles2003 and commented:

    And the beat goes on in my belle France into 2020. Expect strikes to continue especially on the retirement issue. I had written before on it so I am just tagging update information here. Hope it helps you understand us ::)
    France is still the champion of early retirement with an average posted at 60.8 years, according to the overview of pensions from the OECD,(Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) published Wednesday, November 27, 2019. Today, the age required to obtain a full retirement rate is 64 years on average in OECD countries for those who retired in 2018. It is 63 years in France due to the penalty imposed by Agirc-Arrco, (Agirc= L’Agirc est l’Association générale des institutions de retraite des cadres) (Arrco= l’Association pour le régime de retraite complémentaire des salaries) complementary scheme for private sector employees, since 2019. Info in French here : https://www.agirc-arrco.fr/particuliers/

    Thus, in the OECD, the retirement age at full rate will be 66 years, as in France due to the lengthening of the contribution period provided for by the Touraine reform, combined with the application of the penalty of the AGIRC ARRCO. So much for the theory, but in practice, that is to say if we look at the real age at which active people retire, the picture is different. According to the OECD, the average age for leaving the labor market in France is 60.8 years, the lowest, and 4 years lower than the OECD average. The replacement rate, the difference between the last salary and the pension level after a full career with an average salary in the private sector, it stands at 74%, a figure well above the OECD average of 58%.

    The international organization concludes that France offers very good social protection for retirees with one of the lowest poverty rates. But the problem is the complexity of the system. It is for this reason that the OECD gives a favorable opinion on the establishment of a universal system. And the reason the French government is trying and the unions are opposed as seen by the so far 26 days of strikes in France!

    This analysis refers to a flow equilibrium but do not forget all the accumulated deficits which represent debt for future generations. The pension system needs to be balanced on average over the long term. An observation that could attract the ear of the government at a time when the question is what measures the executive could take to restore balance to the pension system by 2025. The OECD also criticizes the structure complex of the system with the concomitance of 42 different pension schemes, which would in particular have the effect of preventing workers from anticipating their future rights (indeed confusing). A remark which, contrary to the postponement of the retirement age, goes in the direction of the future pension reform carried by current administration in France, aiming to unify all these plans. The union response is the system is not broke and this idea will bring more people into the poverty level and making them work longer which they already got this benefit to work less than in the rest of the developed countries such as in the OECD.

    The 2020 pension reform does not plan to raise the minimum retirement age, which will therefore remain fixed at 62 years. However, the reform introduce an equilibrium age in order to encourage active workers to leave later, via a system of discounts and premiums on pension amounts. This age was intended to be 64. This is a key point in the strikes as the unions are totally against this pivot age. They like to have the choice to retire at 62 period.

    Some of the strikes going on or announce in the near future are
    Strike of CTS buses and trams in Strasbourg from 24 December 2019 to 5 January 2020. Unlimited national strike at SNCF from December 5, 2019. Unlimited strike at RATP from December 5, 2019. National strike by lawyers from 6 to 12 January 2020
    National strike in the refineries from 7 to 10 January 2020. General and national strike on January 9, 2020. National strike of doctors, lawyers and pilots on February 3, 2020. National strike in air transport from December 5, 2019.
    Plan ahead if coming over and enjoy the trip. And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!

    Like

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