Shakespeare and Company ,Paris of course!

And in Paris for English language, history and tradition heads for Sharkepeare and Company bookstore!  Wow, I was here a few time earlier upon arrival but it has been years not stopping by until now. My walks did it for me and was able to take a peek again at this venerable institution in Paris. 

Shakespeare and Company is an independent bookstore located in the 5éme arrondissement of Paris. Shakespeare and Company serves both as a bookstore and a library specializing in English literature. The floor also serves as a refuge for travelers (tumbleweeds), hosted in exchange for a few hours of daily work in the bookstore. This is very close to Notre Dame Cathedral and Place St Michel.

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The name “Shakespeare and Company” was first that of an earlier bookstore, founded and directed by the American Sylvia Beach, and located at 8 rue Dupuytren from 1919 to 1921, then at 12 rue de l’Odeon  from May 1921 to 1941. This establishment was considered during the inter-war period as the center of Anglo-American culture in Paris. He was often visited by the  “Lost Generation” writers such as Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein and James Joyce.

It was Sylvia Beach who published, in 1922, the first edition of James Joyce’s book, Ulysses, which was subsequently banned in the United States and England. Shakespeare and Company published several other editions of Ulysses. In April 1927, the bookstore became the publisher and distributor of the avant-garde Transition magazine founded among others by Eugène Jolas. This first “Shakespeare and Company” was closed in December 1941 because of the German occupation during WWII. The store would have been closed because Sylvia Beach had refused to sell the last copy of Joyce’s Finnegans Wake to a German officer. The store in the rue de l’Odeon has never reopened.

In 1951, another English language bookstore was opened in Paris by the American George Whitman, under the sign “Le Mistral”, at 37 rue de la Bûcherie. It was at the death of Sylvia Beach in 1962, that the name of this second bookstore was changed to “Shakespeare and Company”. In the 1950s, many Beat Generation writers such as Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso and William S. Burroughs lived there. Whitman’s daughter, Sylvia, now takes care of the shop, near Place Saint-Michel and close to the Seine. George Whitman’s daughter, Sylvia, took over the shop in 2001

Every two years since 2003, the FestivalandCo is held in Paris, where English-speaking writers who are in vogue and discover are meeting in Paris. Sylvie Whitman runs the bookstore for the sake of a perpetual encounter between the book and the reader. The layout of the boutique, the organized activities, such as the creation in 2010 of a literary prize Paris Literary Prize or weekly readings, are all ways to promote this meeting. There is even a coffee shop such as Shakespeare and Company Coffee. 37, rue de la Bûcherie. Tel . +33 01 43 25 95 95. From Monday to Fridays from 10h to 18h30. Saturday and Sunday from 10h to 19h30. The official page on the Café section here: Shakespeare and Company Café

The official webpage: Official Shakespeare and Company

The Festival here: Official Festival and Co

There you go folks another dandy in my eternal Paris, wow  and I just tap the surface! So much life, chic , cosy, quant, you name it you find it in Paris. And so much beauty all around you lol! Read a book its good for you and at Sharespeare and Company even better!

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

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4 Comments to “Shakespeare and Company ,Paris of course!”

  1. I love this bookshop!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Brings back memories of when I was a jeune fille au pair ! Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

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