Church Saint Martin at Saint Martin sur Oust!

So bringing you back to my beautiful Morbihan and its small picturesques towns on the off the beaten path. I like to introduce Saint Martin sur Oust to you. So much for updating older posts which ,also, allows me to find these missing gems. Hope you enjoy the post on the Church Saint Martin at Saint Martin sur Oust!

Another picturesque small town in my beautiful Morbihan in an off the beaten path discovery of Saint Martin sur Oust. Deep Morbihan indeed!

Saint-Martin-sur-Oust is apparently a dismemberment of the Gallo-Roman parish of Glénac. In feudal times, the territory depends on the Rieux family . It is erected in town  in the French revolutionary period of 1790 as most if not all French towns. Saint-Martin, also known as Saint-Martin-sur-Oust, because of the river that bound it to the south, is contiguous to Saint-Laurent, Ruffiac, Saint-Nicolas-du-Tertre, Les Fougerêts, Peillac, Saint-Gravé and Saint-Gongard. The town is located close to the river Oust, and 10 km La Gacilly and 54 km from Vannes.

The Church Saint Martin built from the 15C to 1959, renovated in 1853 for the bell tower and transept, then finally rebuilt in 1959. From the 15C Church, there was only one third-point door at the beginning of the 20C and a stained glass window with a radiant lattice. The nave and the choir had been rearranged in the 18C. The cross-braces and the bell tower were also redone in 1853. The bell tower has three broken hanger openings. On the façade, the fenestration is underlined by clear stones. The pinion, backed by two buttresses, is pierced by two oculi. The door and the cowl date back to the 15C. The altarpiece dates from the 17C,  it presents in its center a painting appearing a crucifixion and the lateral niches house the statues of St. John the Baptist and Saint Michael. There are some old wooden statues including a statue of St. Martin with his sword and his coat to give to the poor. A simple ogive door, and a window of the same style with clover and triodes mullets. The lateral altars were dedicated one to the Rosary, the other to Saint Blaise and St. William, a 3rd to St. Julien and St. Margaret, a 4th, removed since then, to St. Barbara, they are today under the words of the Blessed Virgin, the Sacred Heart and St. Peter.

St Martin sur Oust

Other things to see here are : Chapel of Saint-Mathurin dite, in its time, Saint-Mathurin-des-Garais. Two dates can be read on its door lintels: 1602 and 1681. This already testifies to several improvements. The civil status archives show marriages there around 1580 … Its altarpiece has just been restored in 2007. The Chapel of Saint-Léonard Its pediment bears a date: 1651. The existence of a chapel of Saint- Léonard, in this sector, has been established since 1155. It was then a small colony founded by a monastery of women, the Saint-Sulpice abbey in Rennes. Walk on the Nantes-Brest canal or on its banks: village of Saint-Martin, Guélin lock, Guélin bridge by the towpath, possibility of extension to various directions in the countryside.

The city of Saint Martin sur Oust on its history/heritage: http://www.st-martin-sur-oust.fr/presentation_saint-martin-sur_oust.aspx

So this is a picturesque little town of  Saint Martin sur Oust of about 1300 folks sitting right in the countryside of the Morbihan sitting by the center of a nice visiting triangle of Maletroit, La Gacilly ,and Rochefort en Terre! see posts. Hope you enjoy this gem and do dare to come into the off the beaten path of my Morbihan dept 56 of my lovely Bretagne.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

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