Paris: Rue du Havre !

And back on my favorite streets of my eternal Paris. Well this one is very popular even if not notice the name the world passes by here. Just out of Gare Saint Lazare was my routine for several years and took this street to get to work as preferred to walk than go underground; the time was the same!

Therefore, let me tell you a bit on the Rue du Havre of my eternal Paris. Memories flashing back as I write.

The Rue du Havre is a street of the 8éme arrondissement (side of odd numbers) and 9éme arrondissement (side of even numbers). It begins on Boulevard Haussmann and ends on Rue Saint-Lazare. In front of Gare St Lazare train station. It took the name of rue du Havre because the trains leaving from this terminal made it possible to go to Le Havre.

paris

The creation of Rue du Havre responded to the desire to facilitate traffic around the terminal of the Saint-Germain, Versailles and Rouen railways, built in 1837 (now Gare Saint-Lazare) The section between rue de Provence and rue Saint-Lazare was opened under royal decree of September 3, 1843 which fixed its width at 20 meters and gave it two 30-meter cut sections at the outlet on rue Saint-Lazare and two others 5 meters at the corners of rue Saint-Nicolas-d’Antin. The section of Rue du Havre between boulevard Haussmann and rue de Provence was originally part of rue de la Ferme-des-Mathurins (now rue Vignon) and was aligned in 1839.

The nice thing to see here and I passed by it every day to work for several years is at No 8: Lycée Condorcet (high school) founded in 1803 and installed in the buildings of the Capuchin convent of Saint-Louis-d’Antin, built in the 1780s by the neoclassical architect Alexandre-Théodore Brongniart. (yes same as Palais Brongniart or Bourse). Very high rank on school notes in France and many illustrious alumni from former Presidents of France to Georges Eugène Haussmann ,founders of automobile empires, and aviation like Renault and Dassault, the arts in Marcel Proust and Paul Verlaine, Boris Vian, Serge Gainsbourg and ,also, Bảo ĐạI last emperor of Vietnam.

Another short nice memorable street of my Paris with lots of souvenirs meeting my dear late wife Martine at the Garnier or Starbucks for a coffee before heading home together. Not all the time but did indeed went into the Passage du Havre (see post) for some shopping and getting the latest from FNAC . The San Marina shoe store was another spot for shopping on way home. Not to mention the kids from the Lycée Condorcet always loud ; there is one small church here that never had gone in…Church Saint Louis d’Antin-Espace Bernanos with many musical events as well as a chapel. This was an initiative of king Louis XVI in 1783 and with services since 1795 and parish as of 1802.  During his stay in Paris for the coronation of the Emperor Napoleon, Pope Pius VII celebrated Mass there on January 13, 1805. At the same time, the State took possession of the former premises of the convent to establish a high school there, which after several appellations will become in 1883, the Lycée Condorcet as above.

Paris

After arriving Rue de Provence turning left you go behind entrances to the grand department stores Au Printemps and Galeries Lafayette which we like to avoid the crowds of the front. In all Rue du Havre is very lively, good ambiance, wonderful buildings and a lot of great souvenirs.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!

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2 Comments to “Paris: Rue du Havre !”

  1. I know that fnac store in your last photo, because I have sometimes bought books there, also tickets for shows and museums.

    Liked by 1 person

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