The Place de la Concorde and its beauties!!!

I, again, written before on the Place de la Concorde, but been so an integral part of Paris, it needs more from me. Anyway, I worked not far from it and my lunch walks were done here too, not to mention my civil duties having the USA Embassy just by it.  So much on its history,and things in it, but forgot that the beautiful fountains and statues needs more. Therefore, take another post from me on the Place de la Concorde and its beauties!!! Hope you enjoy it as I.

The Place de la Concorde is located at the center via the Pont de la Concorde which crosses the Seine towards the 7éme arrondissement, on the Palais Bourbon (Assamblée Nationale).  Administratively, the square itself is located in the Champs-Élysées neightborhood of which it is the eastern end. But the two buildings that border it to the north, on either side of the rue Royale, are in the Madeleine neighborhood, in the 8éme arrondissement, while the Tuileries garden which adjoins it is located in the Saint -Germain-l’Auxerrois neighborhood /quartier of the 1éme arrondissement. All gorgeous!

It first became Place de la Concorde under the Consulate in 1795, then “place Louis XVI” in 1826 on the initiative of king Charles X, in honor of his late brother. It was finally in 1830 that the place (re)takes its definitive name: Concorde. The exact location of the guillotine in the Place de la Concorde was at the entrance to what is now Avenue des Champs-Elysées.  The development of the Place de la Concorde under the July Monarchy at the end of the 1830s. In fact, it takes up part of the plan drawn up by Ange Jacques Gabriel in the middle of the 18C, with embelishments showing the geographical direction corresponding to the cities they represent in relation to Paris.

The decoration of the Place de la Concorde was carried out between 1833 and 1846 by the architect Jacques Hittorff. Around the obelisk framed by two fountains, eight statues, representing eight different French cities, have been installed on pedestals located at the corners of an octagon, You see eight statues placed on the corner sentry boxes representing eight French towns. Lyon, Marseille, Lille, Strasbourg, Lyon, Marseille, Bordeaux and Nantes, On either side of the obelisk,(see post) are place two large cast iron fountains, called the Fontaine des Mers or Fountain of the Seas and the Fontaine des Fleuves or Fountain of the Rivers. 

paris pl de la concorde obelisk fontaine de nantes et eiffel afar nov19

These 8 statues each rest on a small pavilion, called the gatehouse of Gabriel, in memory of the architect who laid out the square under Louis XV. Several characteristics give them this beautiful homogeneity: a crown representing a castle tower, a very richly done hairstyle, a draped dress, a seated position, looking towards the center of the square attributes to each hand representing the wealth or arms of the city represented, It is thus, an economic wealth of the whole country, posed in its stature which is represented close to those provided by the rivers and the seas through the fountains.

paris pl de la concorde statue Lille et jeu de paume mus nov19

The statues of the cities of Lille and Strasbourg. They are the only ones in the place who hold a sword in their hands and whose crowns on their heads are square, The statues of Lyon and Marseille are in the spotlight. On either side of the first, notice the two amphorae that let their contents flow out. This is how the Rhône and the Saône are represented. It is from these two emblematic rivers of Lyon that the city has drawn all its power. Marseille is sitting on a boat whose prows you can admire to the left and right of the statue. This highlights the importance of the port of Marseille in the history of France. Finally, in his right hand is an olive branch, symbol of the Mediterranean. A bowl of fruit, including grapes, in the left hand and the city’s coat of arms in the days of Richard Coeur de Lion in the right hand… You recognize Bordeaux! Nantes is above the latter with the city’s coat of arms in her left hand. And as for Marseille, on both sides of its base are represented the prows of a boat, a symbol of the influence of the city in the maritime domain. The statue of Brest and the one whose Normans will be able to recognize the coat of arms, Rouen ,closer to the Crillon and Marine hotels, The anecdote here is that they all look towards the center of the square!

paris pl de la concorde statue Rouen et Brest eiffel jan13

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You have the fountains both done in 1840, such as the Fountain of the Seas , Architect: Jacques Hittorff ,and several sculptors such as Jean-Baptiste Debay fils (The Ocean and the Mediterranean), Desboeufs (Fishing for pearls, Fishing for shells, Fishing for fish, Fishing for corals), Jean-Jacques Feuchère (Astronomy, Commerce and Maritime Navigation), Antonin Moine, Elshoecht and Merlieux (the three Tritons and the three Nereids), Hoegler (ornamental sculpture).

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Also, the Fountain of the Rivers ,Architect: Jacques Hittorff, and several sculptors such as Gechter (The Rhône and the Rhine), Honoré Husson (The Harvest of the Grape Harvest), François Lanno (The Harvest of Flowers and the Harvest of Fruit), Brion ( Agriculture, Industry, River Navigation), Antonin Moine, Elshoecht and Merlieux (the three Tritons and the three Nereids), Hoegler (ornamental sculpture).

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paris pl de la concorde fontaine des fleuves hotel marine nov19

The Paris tourist office on the Place de la Concorde: https://en.parisinfo.com/transport/90907/Place-de-la-Concorde

There you go folks, feel better now to be able to add this wonderful story in my blog on the gorgeous Place de la Concorde of Paris! and to show off its beauties ,sentry boxes, statues, fountains etc. Love it!! This is Paris!!

And remember, happy travels, good health,and many cheers to all!!!

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