The passages of Paris, a revisit!!

Ok so as told not a shopping expert but indulge on it with my family and friends when going out in Paris or coming for a visit. One of the places I take them is the passages of Paris!!! I have written before on them, but this is a more detail review with short introductions to each. Again, this is on my black and white series.

Paris is full of secret places, testimonies of the history of the city. Discovering them helps to better understand the past of it. Take the covered passages of Paris, for example. In the 19C, thanks to Baron Haussmann’s grand urban transformation plan, the capital had more than 70! Their goal was to protect the wealthy population from the mud and the bustle of the streets by offering them passageways protected from the weather by beautiful glass roofs and bringing together many shops and restaurants in one and the same place.

First, what is a passage? Well best describe as a private lane open to the public, a shortcut between several lanes, whether it is covered or not. A pedestrian space, the passage can house both commerce and housing. Only the abundant decoration and the luxury of the shops differentiate a gallery from a passage. Today, the covered passages and their timeless charm have won back the hearts of Parisians who crowd alongside those that have been tastefully restored, sulking those disfigured by the lack of maintenance or the multiplication of stalls without elegance. . While many of them have disappeared as the city has evolved, many other passages have survive. Here is my take on them; hope you enjoy it as I.

Passage des Panoramas (2éme arrondissement). One of the oldest covered passages in Paris as built in 1799, and undoubtedly the most authentic with its many lights and period decorations!

Galerie Vivienne (2éme arrondissement). The most chic gallery in the capital with its mosaic floor and its luxury boutiques.

Passage du Grand-Cerf (2éme arrondissement). With its 12 meters high and its huge glass roof, it is one of the highest and brightest passages in the capital.

Passage Brady (10éme arrondissement). It is one of the few to be made up of two parts separated by Boulevard de Strasbourg since 1852: one part is covered by a glass roof and houses Indo-Pakistani, Mauritian and Reunionese traders, while the other is in the open.

Passage Choiseul (2éme arrondissement). Today, less traveled, it nevertheless had a facelift in 2013.

Passage Verdeau (9éme arrondissement). Located in the extension of the Passage des Panoramas and Jouffroy, the Passage Verdeau is one of the most charming with its antique dealers and other unusual shops.

Passage Jouffroy (9éme arrondissement). This is the first passage to have had underfloor heating and a metal frame, a revolution in architectural terms.

Passage Vendôme (3éme arrondissement). It is now almost abandoned. This does not prevent it from being part of the list of passages classified as historical monuments.

Passage Molière (3éme arrondissement). Its peculiarity can be found in the building numbers which follow an anti-clockwise progression. Uncommon !

Galerie Véro-Dodat (Iéme arrondissement). From 1966 to 2004, the whole of Paris ran to the shop of Robert Capia (French actor and antique dealer). In 2018, Parisians discovered an equally spectacular store there: that of Christian Louboutin.

Passage du Caire (2éme arrondissement). With its 370 meters in length, the Passage du Caire is the longest in Paris, but also one of the narrowest and above all, the oldest built in 1798, with its fishbone glass roof.

Passage des Princes (2éme arrondissement). In this passage which is the last one to be built in Paris during the Haussmann era as open in 1860. Before it was one here called the Mirés; now there are many stores dedicated to toys (a Toys Club store is located there) and video games; a temple that has something to delight young and old! And of course, my boys ruined me each time here until finally can pay on their own thanks God!!!

Galerie Colbert (2éme arrondissement). It does not house any boutique but only research institutes and laboratories linked to the history of art and cultural heritage. It is no less sublime!

Galerie de la Madeleine (8éme arrondissement). A small, quiet place located near a passage where it is pleasant to have a drink. A sentimental favorite as when worked nearby stop here for a drink many times!

The list does not end above , there are more still accessible to the public. These are the passage du Prado (10éme arrondissement), the passage du Havre (9éme arrondissement ,off gare st lazare and very much visited), the passage Puteaux (8éme arrondissement), the passage Sainte-Anne (2éme arrondissement), the passage du Ponceau (2éme arrondissement ), the passage of Bourg-l’Abbé (2éme arrondissement), the passage Ben Aïad (2éme arrondissement) , and the passage of Deux-Pavillons (1éme arrondissement).

Unfortunately, there have been several who have closed their doors such as the passage Alfred-Stevens, the Cour Batave, the Galerie Bergère (completely destroyed), the Galerie Boufflers, the Galerie de la Bourse , the passage de la Ville-l’Évêque, the Galerie Montesquieu , and the passage du Trocadéro.

The city of Paris going outs on the passages:https://www.sortiraparis.com/arts-culture/histoire-patrimoine/articles/172520-the-most-beautiful-covered-passages-in-paris/lang/en

The Paris tourist office on the passages: https://en.parisinfo.com/discovering-paris/museums-monuments-heritage-paris/the-unique-charm-of-parisian-covered-passages

The Association of passages et galeries of Paris : http://passagesetgaleries.fr/passages-parisiens/

There you go folks, hope you find it helpful for your next shopping trip to Paris. Or just browse these wonders of architecture in the most beautiful city in the world, Paris.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

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2 Comments to “The passages of Paris, a revisit!!”

  1. I love all Paris’ passages

    Liked by 1 person

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