The Rome antique, and its squares!!!

A while back after many trips solo to Italy decided to take the family to Rome as a starting point for Italy. It was a long two weeks memorable vacation which we all enjoy and now many souvenirs of that trip. Already with several posts in my blog, let me update the introduction to the Rome antique and its squares from August 2013 to you and hope you enjoy it as we did. This of course, in my black and white series counter. Therefore, as an introduction will be brief, plenty more on them in my blog and pictures.

Having traveled to many countries, and been to Italy many times, even Rome , but always on business trips. This time for our summer vacation we decided to attack as a family the eternal city. Much have been said of this wonderful city and its historical meaning, I will tell you what is today.

Even in Italian news programs there was talk of making the via fiori imperiali pedestrian, they tried tested this summer and they like it locals and visitors alike. So maybe something to do for the future on a permanent basis..But is was not to be.

The parking is chaotic, and the road clogged; and I know how to drive in big cities! The metro or subway is very limited even thus the B1 is in expansion construction and the new line C is ,also, under construction; badly needed. Finally, the line 3 was done in 2014.  The bus system is great but for the uninitiated can be complicated because they only post the end line and not the stops, so you need to go to the stop and read the places the bus goes, the online system ATAC is not user friendly either if compare to France or even Spain that I know very well too.

Last we went to the Antiques of Rome, the Colosseum, Foro Romano, and the Palatino, all classical places and known to many.

The colosseum is the great roman amphitheater  built during the Roman Empire and was inaugurated in the year 80. It was then used for performances of great popular appeal, such as hunts and gladiator combats. The first phase of construction of the Colosseum was financed with the proceeds of the plunder of the temple in Jerusalem by Vespasian in 72. His son and successor Titus, in 80, added the third and fourth row of seats .

The Roman Forum or Foro Romano, is indeed a grand event for walking this area alone. The Roman Forum was the old center of ancient Rome where, from the 5C BC to 5C AC, the most important monuments were built. The entire area of the Roman Forum is one of the biggest archeological sites in the world containing temples, buildings and monuments from the Republican era until today. Inside the Roman Forum you can admire the Arch of Settimio Severo, the Temple of Saturno, the Vestali’s house, the Mamertine Prison, the Temple of Antonino and Faustina and the Arch of Tito.

The palatine or Palatino area, great for walking along ancient monuments, This is a large archeological area located between Roman Forum and Circus Maximus. It contains the old Emperor residences, arches, temples and thermae. The legend says that Rome had its origins on this hill and, indeed, recent excavations have shown that people were living in the Palatine since 1000 BC. According to Roman tradition, the Palatine was the place where Romulus and Remus were found by the she-wolf that nursed them keeping them alive in the “Cave of the Lupercale”, probably found in recent excavations, and for this reason on this hill was celebrated every year the festival of Lupercalia.

We , also, walk all over and really like the piazzas or squares of Rome! Coming to Rome ,one of the things I always heard and later briefly came were the wonderful squares there or piazzas in Italian. Therefore, i made it a point to visit as many as possible while there with the family. To remember them there are the piazza Cavour, Colonna, Spagna, Giavanni in laterano, Napoleone I, Navona, Popolo, Venezia, Santa Maria in Trasteverde, San Lorenzo in Lucina, and vittorio emanuele .

The piazza Cavour was very nice along the palace of justice and behind the castel sant angelo, with an imposing statue of Mr Cavour. Piazza Colonna is the center of it with nice old palazzos and buildings with the great galleria alberto sordi and many shopping areas.

Piazza di Spagna is the famous one of the steps, with great shops and history, Bernini’s fountain and the celebrated Spanish Steps rising up towards the Church of Trinità dei Monti. Home to English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley, the world-famous piazza, located at the foot of the Pincio Hill, has always been considered both a priceless cultural gem as well as popular tourist attraction.

Piazza San Giovanni en Laterano is where the huge beautiful cathedral of Rome is located. Decorated in its center with an Egyptian obelisk in granite from the 14C BC that was at the place of the Grand Circus for a long time and now gives access to the Palace of Laterano.

Piazza Napoléone I, is right inside the Villa Borghese, at the mont of Pincus, offering a plunging view of the city towards the Piazza del Pololo to which it is link by stairs ,giving a wonderful panorama of the city. Of course, Napoléon could not be without one in Rome, he even name his son king of Rome!

Piazza Navona, is a wonderful one that we like a lot.  It is the most elegant and cheerful of all Roman piazzas, and we agree. It was built on the site of Stadium of Domitian in the 1C  A.D.  This is where Roman children received their gifts from the wise men by Jan 6th, and you should not missed seeing the Fountain of The Four Rivers and Church of Saint’Agnese in Agone.

Piazza del Popolo, is a huge square with three roads coming into it , the Via del Corso was our entry point into it always. Once there you will the writing by Bernini  over the northern gate, Porta del Popolo, (the former Porta Flaminio) “Felice faustoque ingressini MDCLV” “For a happy and blessed entrance”; a message left for Queen Christina on her arrival in Rome following her conversion to Roman Catholicism. In the piazza there are the twin Churches of Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto, with the  obelisk at center  (known as the Oblisco Flaminio) which is the oldest and second tallest in Rome and the two Valadier fountains, also, see the wonderful Church of Santa Maria del Popolo ,built on the burial site of Emperor Nero.

Piazza Venezia, is very popular with filmgoers, and it has the impressive   The square is of course dominated by the overpowering “Altare della Patria” (Altar of the Fatherland) a monument to honour Victor Emanuel II, unified Italy’s first king.  You will see the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Incorporated in the massive pure white marble structure, which was built between 1885 and 1905, it serves to honour and remember every soldier who lost his life during WWI and who remains unidentified. From here Mussolini used to make his speeches. After much work to preserve the character of this square , Palazzo Venezia,and  Palazzo Bonaparte where Napoleon’s mother, Letizia Ramolino once lived until her death in 1818.

Piazza Santa Maria in Trasteverde, located in the popular district and on the spot of the beautiful church basilica of Santa Maria in Trasteverde; its sparkling 15C fountain, said to be the work of Bramante, 17C Palazzo San Callisto, and glittering gold mosaics of the Basilica of Santa Maria in Trasteverde, while in the evening it is transformed into a lively meeting place for night-lifers, with the restaurants and bars’ tables overrunning the paving and all and sundry soaking up the atmosphere on the steps of the fountain.

Piazza San Lorenzo in Lucina, a very nice fashionable area today. As it said churches started from private homes that allowed worshiped on them this is what is thought of the one here ,church of San Lorenzo in Lucina (b. 4-5C  A.D.). It was dedicated to St. Lawrence the Martyr as late as in the 12C, when some relics (including the alleged grid-iron of the saint’s martyrdom) were placed here. The tourist office will ask you ,who is Lucina? Tradition has it she was a rich pious Roman matron, owner of the original home on which the church is built. However given Lucina was an epithet for Juno, the Roman Goddess of heaven and also protector of Roman women, it is feasible that the church may at one time have been a temple, a shrine dedicated to her. Nice story , I buy it lol!

Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, this is a huge square, also known as Piazza Vittorio,in the Esquilino Rione. Surrounded by palazzi with large porticoes of nineteenth-century style, the square was created by Gaetano Koch shortly after the transfer of the capital of Italy from Florence to Rome in 1871. With nearly 10,000 square feet in addition to St. Peter’s square, the largest square in Rome (316 x 174 m). In the middle of the square umbertino style emerged spontaneously since the late 1800s, with large blocks of flats that the recingevano, a large open-air market, especially of food but not only. The food stalls were placed daily, from sunrise to two long sides of the large garden. The market remained in business until the 1990s, much frequented by the Romans for the convenience of prices, and also by tourists hunting for folklore. The Nuovo Mercato Esquilino reflects the multi-ethnic characteristics undertaken in recent decades by the square, and  a strong foreign pressure, both in personal goods. In the middle of the square there is a garden that shows the remains of the nymphaeum of Alexander, and the so-called magic door, the entrance to Villa Palombara, residence of the Alchemist Massimiliano Palombara.

Some webpages to help plan your trip here as usual from me are

The official tourist office of Romehttp://www.turismoroma.it/?lang=en

And, Archeoroma a nice cultural historical sights of Rome:https://www.archeoroma.org/sites/

You can be sure a trip to Rome will make your money’s worth! We will be back, for now hope you enjoy the post as I do.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

Tags: ,

6 Comments to “The Rome antique, and its squares!!!”

  1. I went to Rome in 1976, my first European holiday – a fortnight in Sorrento with my dad. Thanks for the memory nudge.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: