Paris: Sainte Trinité Church!!

Bear with me as this is another memorable spot in my eternal Paris. I am updating the post from 2018 in my blog. I used to come to work to Paris by gare Saint Lazare and as time allow , walked around the area. Finally, heard about this church and walk to it, saw it briefly and then came back with the family. Memories of Paris at the Church de la Sainte Trinité.

In my continuing saga to present to you places of history, and architecture and religion very close to the membrane of Paris, I present to you the Holy Trinity Church or église de La Sainte Trinité very near the gare Saint Lazare train station along rue Saint Lazare  This is a very popular area with visitors and locals alike as the train station Gare Saint Lazare is very near and good transports on RER, Metro, and Bus abound. It is very central to see all of Paris.

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The église de la Sainte Trinité, was built between 1861 and 1867 in a Second Empire period. It is an imposing renaissance building to impress the crowds with 90 meters long and 34 meters wide and 30 meters high with an imposing 17 meters wide nave. It has a metal frame and the aisles were done as not to disturb the faithful during Mass. It has excellent illumination by having the stained glass windows in simple white glass. The side chapels have paintings from the 19C with a look of theatrical interiors.

So here is my story on the église de la Sainte Trinité de Paris.

The Holy Trinity Church is at the square or Place d’Estienne-d’Orves in the 9éme district or arrondissement and taken the space of the quartiers or neighborhoods of the Chaussée d’Antin and Saint Georges at the crossing of rue Blanche , rue de Clichy, rue de la Chaussée d’Antin, rue Saint Lazare, and rue de Châteaudun. It gives the name to the metro station of line 12 Trinité-d’Estienne d’Orves.

As like many other Churches of Paris the Church of the Holy Trinity was built during the Second Empire (Napoléon III) the architect was Théodore Ballu who also did the Basilica of Sainte Clotilde. The Church of the Holy Trinity was finished in 1867,in an imposing neo renaissance half Italian half French style that created an attraction in the neighborhood. The style was done as well mentioned by many as a basilical type as the Church of Saint François-Xavier (see post) with a metallic backbone as only one block of iron could allow such proportions ,and the sides were kept narrow as not to bothered the visitors during Mass.  The Church has a wonderful lighted clear view thanks to the stained glass windows in white with only the abside using colored windows with history. The lateral Chapels have a series of religious paintings from the 19C. The theatrical look at is vastness inside has given contemporaries now to call a masterful construction.

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The choir is raise to follow the declination of the land surrounded by two tribunes with columns ;this space was hoping the visit of the Emperor Napoléon III but he never came. The nerf is long of 17 meters decorated with sculptures , statues, and vases all below a vaulted ceiling of floral and arabesque paintings. The monumental painting on the arch that falls on the choir was consecrated to the Holy Trinity. Many specialists call it audacious because the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit are holding hand. The Church remained loyal to the practices of the times such as the proclamation of the Church’s dogma, and apparitions of the Virgin to reinforce the beliefs.

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The bell tower of the Church of the Holy Trinity is at 65 meters high, the bells are in octagonal form finish by a dome in the French renaissance style. The façade in front of the Place Etienne d’Orves has a heterocyclic style typical of the Second Empire period as many train stations done at the time. The three statues in the front illustrate the Holy Trinity, and four statues in the extremes of the façade represent the four cardinal virtues; below is the Force with a sword on her right side.

During the French revolution the pulpit of the Church of the Holy Trinity served as a revolutionary tribunal of very dreadful decisions. In the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 the Church becomes a hospital. The nave is big and covered in wood, gave a good hospital during the siege of Paris. In the winter of 1870-71 the heating system of the Church was not enough so temporary heating chimneys were installed that stained the ceiling. The parishioners are squat on the floor attending the wounded with everybody in the vicinity helping out even a kitchen and laundry was set up in the Crypt.

In March 11 1869 the funeral of Hector Berlioz was held here. The parish Church was consecrated in 1913 and it was the first one in France to be given to the community of Emmanuel in 1986 to help out the clergy there and still does today. The webpage for the community of Emmanuel is here : http://emmanuel.info/

The organ was built in 1869 by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll a renown organ maker, very badly damaged during the events after 1870 it was completely rebuilt by Cavaillé-Coll and Alexander Guilmant.  This later composer created most of the works performed in the organ and the Church is a site to listen to very good concerts even today.

Some further webpages to help you plan your trip here are

The Church of the Holy Trinity official webpage: https://latriniteparis.com/arts-culture/

the Paris tourist office on the Church of the Holy Trinityhttps://en.parisinfo.com/paris-museum-monument/71806/Paroisse-de-la-Trinite

The Catholic churches of Paris webpage on the église de la Sainte Trinité:  https://www.paris.catholique.fr/-sainte-trinite-1272-.html

You will have a blast visiting and walking the area very lively and visited part of Paris with many things to see nearby such as the Opéra Garnier and the department stores on bd Haussmann. Of course, the Church of the Holy Trinity is superbe, my old neighborhood! Hope you have enjoy the post.

And remember, happy travels ,good health, and many cheers to all!!!

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