Echternach, oldest in Luxembourg!

And here I am back into one of my favorites countries of Europe. And one of its most smaller, as well as coming to its oldest city of Echternach! It was a lovely ride and would like to expand a bit on the town.

On one of my days from home in Germany near the Luxembourg border we decided to come to Echternach, I have been by here briefly before , but this time the whole family was in. Echternach is the basilica of Saint Willibrock ,really see my other post.  It was easy for us as we just came from our village up the B51 up to Konz and then to Wasserbillig Luxembourg on the road N10 straight to Echternach. nice ride.

Echternach

Here we came across the old justice palace or now city hall done in the 13-14C and still in great condition very nice in the place du Marché or Moartplaatz. And the best place for wine tasting is at one of the many terraces of the Market Square where you’ll enjoy local delicacies surrounded by centuries-old buildings. The Market Square or Place du Marché or Moartplaatz is also the best place to meet the locals from Echternach.  Whereas Nightlife is rather quiet during the week, the bars can get crowded during weekends.

Echternach

Echternach

Echternach

Enjoy Echternach a medieval looking complex right in the center of town, easy parking. The tourist office is here in English: TOurist office of Echternach

A bit more on the town indeed very quant nice, we like it and will be back.

Echternach is a city in Luxembourg along the Sûre valley marking the border with the German Rhineland-Palatinate State. It is best known for its abbey and its Pentecostal dancing procession (see post). It is the oldest town of Luxembourg. The Echternach Abbey which has become today the town of Echternach had a Roman past. To be more precise, Echternach’s past is said to have a Gallo-Roman origin.  The Roman villa of Echternach was discovered through the installation of the artificial lake that we know today. These archaeological works made it possible to date the villa from the 70s AD!

It was later part of the Electorate of Trier in present-day Germany, and was presented to Willibrord by Irmina , daughter of Dagobert II, king of the Franks (France). Other parts of the Merovingians’ Roman inheritance were presented to the Abbey by king of the Franks Pepin the Short.  Echternach continued to have royal patronage from the house of Charlemagne. In the wake of the French revolution, the monks were dispersed and the abbey’s contents and its famous library were auctioned off. Some of the library’s early manuscripts, such as the famous Echternach Gospels, are now in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris.

During the concluding months of WWII in Europe, on December 16, 1944, Echternach served as the southernmost point on the battlefront for the attempt of the Nazis  Wehrmacht forces attacking the Allies to retake Antwerp, during the Battle of the Bulge. The town was badly damaged in WWII as a conséquence, but was thoroughly restored.

Today, the Portuguese culture has a long tradition in Luxembourg. Portuguese immigration started in the 1960’s and nowadays the Portuguese community represents 16.2% of the Grand-Duchy’s population. As many Luxembourgish towns, Echternach has Portuguese shops, Portuguese bars, and Portuguese traditions are firmly integrated in the local event calendar. Portuguese festival is celebrated in June, and it lasts for 2 days.

More on Echternach on the tourist office of LuxembourgTourist office of Luxembourg on Echternach

And there you folks, I have many posts on Luxembourg and its many towns:cities and of course on the abbey in Echternach. Hope you enjoy the tour.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

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