Archive for October 17th, 2019

October 17, 2019

Some streets of Metz!!

And as you know by reading my blog I like to go the fast way into towns on the road warrior trail but once in them, we will walk the beat and its great in my belle France. As told in some towns before in my blog, the city of Metz is no different to this practice which is recommended to all. Walk it and enjoy it, some streets of Metz.

As you know Metz is in the dept 57 of the Moselle in the new region of Grand Est of my belle France. I like to tell you a bit about some streets of Metz that I like.

The Arsenal is a set of performance and exhibition halls, mainly devoted to classical music and contemporary dance, where numerous recitals and concerts are represented. See my previous post on St Pierre aux Nonnains.  Also, behind the hall Arsenal you see the Chapelle des Templiers a unique vestige of a templar commandery founded in the 12C, and today is also an exhibition hall.

The big parvis or Esplanade de l’Arsenal is located around the above building between boulevard Poincaré and Avenue Ney and below is my parking République! There is a nice statue of Marshal Ney and across is one of the spot of the Christmas market in Metz (we have been at this time and it’s superb). You have plenty of stores, bars, and restaurants around this lively area!

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The Place de la République is the largest square in Metz city center. It was built in 1802, then called Place Royale, next to the old citadel and the limits of the city. During the annexation, the square was renamed Platz des Führers. The Universal Exhibition of 1861 was organized on this square and on the Esplanade which prolongs it. It is bounded by three urban facades, the Avenue Robert-Schuman where is the Bank of France, the rue du Maréchal-Lyautey  which borders the Ney barracks; on the side parallel with Rue Winston-Churchill, a shopping street that runs along the hypercenter and leads to the courthouse. Avenue Ney marks an open boundary on the jardins de l’Esplanade (gardens). From 1964, an above ground parking occupies the place de la République of which it takes the name.

metz

The Station République, formely known as the Galerie République, is an underground shopping arcade with some twenty shops in the Place de la République. In 1987-1988, with the expansion of the car park, an extension of the gallery was dug under the Avenue Winston-Churchill  in order to develop its commercial space and link it to the Galeries Lafayette and FNAC stores. A new access is thus created at rue Winston-Churchill. A wonderful shopping experience!

The Place Saint-Jacques is our favorite square in the city center of Metz, as it is also ,opposite the shopping center , the Centre Saint-Jacques. It is located between the Rue Fabert and  Rue de Ladoucette, in the heart of the historic and pedestrian center of the city, not far from Saint-Etienne Cathedral. Place Saint-Jacques is located near the main crossroads of the old Roman city ( by rue Taison ,and rue En Fournirue) and corresponds roughly to the site of the ancient forum.  The current name of the square appears in the 12C and comes from the Church of Saint-Jacques which bordered it before being demolished in 1574. Today, the place St Jacques is known to the locals Messins for its many restaurants and cafes terraces during the beautiful season. It is, also one of the sites for the wonderful Marché de Nôel or Christmas market in the wonderful city. And we love it here!

Metz

A bit of history and or anecdote I like

During the break-up of German troops in 1918, Metz Catholics fear that they will transform the city into a new Verdun. They pray then to vow to raise a statue to the Blessed Virgin, if the city was spared by the fighting. It was done thanks to the efforts of Bishop Benzler of Metz from 1901 to 1919, however, he was expelled by the French authorities in July 1919 and died in Germany in 1921 .The statue was inaugurated on the feast of the Assumption 1924. The Place Saint-Jacques was chosen for its central location and its proximity to the cathedral.

Again on August 15, 1940, despite the prohibition of meeting people imposed by the Nazis who then occupy the city, and the presence of many armed soldiers, nothing can prevent the devotion of the local Messins for Notre-Dame of Metz, and of to show their patriotic attachment to France. The statue is surrounded by flowers in the colors of France and a huge cross of Lorraine, decorated with flowers tricolor, thistles and a yellow and red ribbon, colors of Lorraine, is attached to the column.  You can read the motto of Lorraine: “Who rubs there pricks.” A chorus suddenly rises from the crowd: “Queen of France – Pray for us – Our hope – Come and save us! . The tradition is honored every year on August 15, the day of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. The Pontifical Mass is first celebrated in the morning at the cathedral, and then vespers are sung, followed by a procession led by the bishop, which goes from the cathedral to the column.

There you go a wonderful set of streets to get lost in this wonderful city of Metz. You will love it here , very quant, traditional, and yes very French indeed. Some streets of Metz hopefully will get you acquainted with this beautiful city.

For guidance, do not forget to stop by the tourist office always the first stop before and during your visits. Tourist office of Metz in English

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

 

 

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October 17, 2019

Porte Serpenoise at Metz!!

So back to the east I said, and the lovely city of Metz, one of the surprises of our interlude in the region of my belle France. As said, there are some additional posts on Metz coming up something needed to do in order to describe better its things to see. I like to tell you a bit more on the Porte Serpenoise  ,a gate in Metz, dept 57 of the Moselle in the new region of Grand Est (Big East).

The Porte Serpenoise gate is a city gate located at the corner of Avenue Robert Schuman and rue du General Gaston-Dupuis in the district of Metz-Center. It remains the symbolic witness associated with several historical events of the city of Metz, which it marked the southern limit of the 3C during the construction of the Roman rampart, until the beginning of the 20C at the time of the destruction of the enclosure..

The first Serpenoise gate is built in the 13C at the same time as the ramparts of the city, on the Roman road coming from Scarpone, city upstream from Metz on the Moselle river. The Via Scarponensis gave a contraction to the name Serpenoise or sometimes even Champenoise. It had an oblique vault crossing the ramparts. It was added in 1466 a cylindrical element connected to the door by a fortified bridge that spanned the canal walls, filled to achieve the current Avenue Foch. Very damaged during the siege of 1552, the Serpenoise medieval gate was demolished in 1561 to make room for the fortifications of the citadel.

The current Porte Serpenoise was rebuilt in 1852, not far from the site where the Scarponne Gate once stood. It is an elbow tunnel of about thirty meters crossing the embankment of the southern rampart. Its bent shape, in an arc, avoids direct artillery fire in the city. The gate serves as a link with the old station. Outside, a bridge spans the ditch of the fortifications. In 1892, the gate is widened and one throws down its external part, the double entrance which precedes the gate inconvenient for the circulation

metz

In 1902-1903, during the dismantling of the ramparts, the inner part was also destroyed. The Serpenoise Gate is remodeled and takes its current form of Arc de Triomphe. Only one section of the gate was retained and four turrets and a staircase are added. It thus becomes an autonomous monument, embellishing the promenade of the new tree-lined boulevard. The two facades are dismantled and united to become a triumphal arch crowned with watchtowers, wearing a grassy slope, evoking a bastion. Some elements come from the Saint-Thiébault rampart.

October 31, 1870, the Prussian troops enter after the defeat of Napoleon III in Sedan, In November 19, 1918, the Allied troops enter the Porte Serpenoise for the liberation of Metz.

Some webpages to help you plan your trip here and you must are

City of Mets on the Porte Serpenoise in French

Tourist office of Metz on the Porte Serpenoise in English

Again, another beauty and we stayed in a hotel not far from it in fact we went by it to access the city center of Metz, a wonderful sight to see every morning and even more so at night, the Porte Serpenoise! To think the allied troops entered by here to liberate the city is awesome me think. Enjoy it

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

 

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October 17, 2019

Porte des Allemands at Metz!

Ok so let’s go east shall we! IN my road warrior trips in France and elsewhere…. I have come to visit the east of the French Republic and one of the towns that impressed us the most was Metz. Even if not on the tops list of folks in that area, it is a must to visit. Metz is in the dept 57 of Moselle in the new region of Grand Est. I have written in a general sense before in my blog, but let me tell you a bit about its wonderful things to see in my next posts.

The Porte des Allemands or gate of the Germans is a fortified city gate in  Metz. It serves as a bridge over the Seille river  from the 13C to the beginning of the 20C. The building is today the most important remnant of the medieval walls of Metz and testifies to the evolution of the military architecture of Metz in the Middle Ages.

metz

It was mentioned first in 1267, the gate of the Germans  was one of the seven main gates of the city, which had twelve others, less important, in medieval times. Both a fortified gate and bridge, the gate spans the Seille river  at the Pont Henry-de-Ranconval (bridge) which now connects the expressway Est Boulevard Andre Maginot, the latter having replaced the ramparts at the beginning of the 20C. The fortified gate dominated the eastern boundary line for nearly 1,200 meters, from the Porte de Mazelle to the Porte Sainte-Barbe. The Porte des Allemands  was part of the medieval walls of Metz. A veritable fortress-gate with towers, battlements and machicolations, the gate of the German owes its name to the knights of the Teutonic Order, or “Hospitaller Brothers of Our Lady of the Germans”, installed at that time in a neighboring street. Their hospice was destroyed by François de Guise, during the siege of Metz of 1552.  The towers dominate the Seille river from a height of 28 meters. The thickness of the walls, which reaches 3.50 meters, is then adapted to the power of the emerging artillery. The bridge is fortified between 1480 and 1550.

Metz

A major renovation project was undertaken in 2013-2014 to open the premises to the public for cultural events. Bleachers and a scenic area are built on an outdoor terrace in the garden behind the great hall. A glass elevator accessible to people of reduced mobility is set up in the north tower which sees its treated framework and its blanket in hollow tiles redone. The elevator joins the terrace which is safe. The rooms of the north tower of the 15C gate are also restored ; the double-screw staircase of this tower gives access to the terrace on the east side. Sanitary facilities are installed and a technical space for heating and air is installed underground.

The city of Metz becomes owner of the Porte des Allemands in 1900. A part is then transformed into a museum. This museum contains until 1918 an archaeological collection from the missing districts, doors or demolished ramparts of the city. On the first and second floor were documents, printed pieces and engravings on the history of Metz since Roman times. The halls also contained seals, coins and medals dating from the war of 1870, as well as Lorraine furniture and costumes and the guillotine, “La Louise”, which would have been active on the Place de la Comédie in 1793. Because of its emblematic value, the nazis made their solemn entry to Metz, by the porte des Allemands on September 23, 1940.

Some webpages to help you plan your trip here and you must are

City of Metz on the Porte des Allemands in French

Tourist office of Metz on the Porte des Allemands in English

There you go another dandy monument in very nice Metz. Hope you enjoy visiting the Porte des Allemands as we did walking to it!

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

 

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