Archive for October 9th, 2019

October 9, 2019

The Massy-Palaiseau station at Massy!

Ok so lets get you to another sort of off the beaten path area of my eternal Paris. This is a place that has been just passed by and only use its transport hub , an important one especially if living in the west of France like me::)

There is a way to get direct from my Vannes train station on the TGV service to Roissy CDG airport or even Disneyland Paris. This is the connection station sometimes and sometimes it goes direct, talking about Massy-Palaiseau . Let me tell you a bit more on it and hope you can use it as well

A bit on the town itself.

Massy is located in the department 91 of Essonne in the region Ile-de-France.  It is at 15 km from Paris-Notre-Dame, point zero of the roads of France, 16 km from Evry, F km from Palaiseau, 34 km from Etampes, 28 km from La Ferte-Alais,30 km from Dourdan, 39 km from Milly-la-Forêt and only 13 km from Versailles. The town is bordered on the north by the course of Bièvre for about 1.52 km (old river now gone from Paris see Rue du Biévre)

The Massy-Palaiseau station, opened in 1883, is currently part of a multimodal hub connected to RER B and C and completed since 1991 by the Massy TGV station (I take)  served by the five French high-speed lines, Atlantique to Rennes , Nantes and Bordeaux, South-East to Lyon then Mediterranean to Marseille and Montpellier, North to Lille and Brussels and now Eastern Europe to Strasbourg. There is also bus stations of Massy-Atlantis and Massy-Vilmorin

Massy

The TGV, RER and bus stations are interconnected by a  241 meter footbridge to allows passengers to reach the RER, TGV and Vilmorin and Atlantis bus stations. In 2022 there should be added the Express line 12 of the Ile-de-France tramway via the Massy-Palaiseau station and the new Massy-Europe station. This line will use up to Épinay-sur-Orge the old Grande Ceinture line and then will run in tramway mode to Courcouronnes and Évry by following the A6 autoroute.

Massy

By road , you have the two ancient roads prior to the 18C, the national road 20 heir to the great royal road from Paris to Toulouse, currently the 920  road (this have taken from Paris to Toulouse! both when name 20 and now 920 )to the far east and the 188 road from the east to the southwest (old road of Chartres main axis of old Massy constituted of the avenue of President-Kennedy,  Rue Gabriel-Péri, rue du mai 8 1945 and the rue de  Paris).

Other than the intersection on TGV from Vannes to Roissy CDG which I have taken several times, there is little to see other than the main one me think of the Opera de Massy, Cultural Center Paul Bailliart, and the Conservatory of Music and Dance.  There is ,also, the Château de Vilgénis rebuilt in 1823,  from its origins of 1755, now owned by Air France!

Some transports info on Massy station to follow

City of Massy as how to come here

Area tourist office Paris Saclay on the TGV intermodes at Massy

And there you go ,the transport tribulations of my belle France. Yes, you notice too almost everything is routed by Paris yes indeed. It all has to do with a National government of a Republic that wanted to crown its jewel in one city, Paris.

The Massy-Palaiseau station is nice big areas, plenty of eating places and easy panels me think. The trip from the west is long ok for me but my father is difficult and he has taken it with me and the boys too. However, it is a great alternative to get to Roissy CDG for many including me and avoid the Paris center, and it is very easy about 32 minutes to Disneyland Paris.

Enjoy the rides at Massy-Palaiseau. And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

 

 

October 9, 2019

St Malo, another magical place in my new Bretagne.

You should have heard of St Malo in the north of Brittany, have been here and need to put this post in front as was done in august 2012 while there took the time to visit some friend from old VT travel forum! It is a must to visit in Brittany or Bretagne. Hope you enjoy the repost exact as it was. And remember, happy travels ,good health, and many cheers to all!!!

Paris1972-Versailles2003

Today was time to visit this city with the family. I have past by rather quickly several times, and even gone in for some shots (see my other post on it here), but this time was an in-depth visit. Even if in-depth always leaves a lot to be desire, one more time at least is merit it. This is a very nice quaint inner old city town.

Saint Malo, sits in departement 35 ille et Vilaine, on the north section of Brittany.  The sea waves here by the bay are amongst the most important in Europe, with the ampleur between low tide and high tide can reach 14 meters (46 feet), therefore it is double what the ampleur of the Atlantic ocean!

A bit of history, it is a very old city dating to celtique times, and once the Romans retreated from the area around the year 423 AD, the area known as…

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October 9, 2019

Pavillon Fleuriau at La Rochelle!

Ok so let me take to an off the beaten path place in very much visited La Rochelle. I have written before on La Rochelle  a lot but need to tell you about this wonderful walk full of history and nice architecture.

The cute Pavillon Fleuriau,  a folie or madness of the 19C overlooking the sea by La Rochelle. It is name after Aimé Benjamin Fleuriau de Touchelonge  a naval officer, colonial administrator and master of the French inverstigations at sea, born in La Rochelle  in 1785 and died on 1862 in the 8éme arrondissement of Paris

La Rochelle

There is a nice walk to get here that we have not done entirely but worth the try. The webpage from the La Rochelle tourist office tells you more but I will translate the part from the French (sometimes the same sometimes not) webpage: https://www.holidays-la-rochelle.co.uk/focus/mail-walk

By leaving the car near the Parc Franck Delmas, you cross the wooded oaks of the Parc d’Orbigny and end facing the ocean, with a superb panorama on the pointe des Minimes and the Phare du Bout du Monde or Lighthouse of the End of the World ! Continuing on this pretty walk, you come out on a very nice view: under the pines, you distinguish the plage de la Concurrence and in the background the tower or tour de la Lantern, recognizable with its gothic spire. Here, you walk in the footsteps of the bourgeois families of La Rochelle and the region which, in the 19C gave way to the vogue of the sea baths by installing on this littoral part of the bathing establishments: cabins to change (ladies and gentlemen did not mix obviously …), rest rooms and access ramp to face the waves !! All this was organized around the Casino, place of relaxation and essential game at a seaside resort worthy of the name.

Continuing, the path winds and bypasses the cute pavilion Fleuriau,  the folie of the 19C overlooking the sea; the walk continues pleasantly on the promenade de la Concurrence which leads to the beach of the same name. From there, two possible options: go to the old Port or stop on a terrace on the beach. For the return, you can fork in front of the Casino to join the shaded allée du Mail and go back to the imposing memorial, set as a final point to these beautiful avenues. On your way do not miss to admire the villas and mansions of the beginning of the last century, which testify to the attraction of La Rochelle for the generations of families in search of iodized air. A refreshing walk, to consume at any age and without moderation.

There is a museum connected here that we have been briefly as it is in another building name after the personage: The Musée du Nouveau Monde or the new world museum opened in 1982 in the mansion or hôtel particulier Fleuriau. The museum retraces the history of relations between the Americas and France as La Rochelle was at the time one of the principal ports of exchange with the Americas in the heart of the slave trade.

Indeed it is a nice walk even if we have not done it completely we will promise. Beautiful views of the sea but for now the Pavillon Fleuriau and my son!

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

 

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