The Basel on transports in Switzerland!

So I have talk a lot of my road warrior campaigns in Europe and elsewhere, as I love the freedom of the road. Not withstanding folks think that all I do is put the pedal to the metal and drive around. Well nothing of the truth if you live in Europe lol! I have taken my faire share of trains, tramways, metros, buses, velib bikes, and especially the best walks on many cities of Europe.

One city that comes to mind for its extensive network of trains, and tramways where everything runs smooth is Basel in Switzerland. I have several posts on it in my blog, my trips there have been on the business side of things. However, I like to tell you a bit on the Basel transport choices.

My trips started always from the Gare de Lyon on the TGV Lyria to Basel. I arrived in Basel train station, which is a beautiful building in city center, and the hotel was just across it, nice lively place lots of people out which is always good.

A bit overall on Basel can be resume into this.  Basel, its the third most populous city in Switzerland ,after Zürich and Geneva, and the capital of the canton of Basel-Ville. The Basel agglomeration is bilingual ,German and French, and Tri-National since it includes the towns of Saint-Louist Huningue, in Alsace, and Weil am Rhein and Lörrach in Baden-Württemberg. The urban area of Basel is called Eurodistrict of Basel. Basel is 70 km north of Bern, 75 km north-west of Zurich, bordering St. Louis, 27 km south of Mulhouse, 60 km south of Colmar and 115 km south of Strasbourg. The famous university of Basel founded in 1460, the first Swiss university , frequented over the centuries by Erasmus of Rotterdam, Paracelse, Daniel Bernoulli, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Jaspers, Nobel laureate Tadeusz Reichstein or the philosopher Jeanne Hersch.

What astound me the most was its intricate transportation network where it is all very punctual and clean. A bit expensive but so is everything with the Swiss… However, the roads are excellent. I have come here by train and used the public transportation but will mention about the road warrior options as would be nice to try it in the future.

It has 4 bridges crossing the Rhine and Birsig rivers. The best known is the Mittlere Brücke, Central. The two most traffic bridges are the Dreirosenbrücke, consisting of two superimposed roads, and the Schwarzwaldbrücke, consisting of a motorway part and a road part. On the Swiss side, you have the A3 highway towards Zurich and Coire, the A2 towards Lucerne, Chiasso and Milan. This highway has a motorway junction south of Basel on the cantonal Road 1 or main road 18 in the direction of Delémont. On the German side, you have the A5 in the direction of Freiburg im Breisgau and Frankfurt. This German highway has a motorway junction north of Basel on the A98 in the direction of Rheinfelden (Baden) in Germany and Rheinfelden (Aargau) in Switzerland and then joins the A3 mentioned above. The latter and short section therefore indirectly corresponds to a motorway bypass of the city of Basel via Germany. On the French side, you have the A35 (this one I rode on it indeed)  in the direction of Mulhouse, Colmar and Strasbourg.

Basel is served by the international Airport of Basel-Mulhouse-Fribourg, also known by its trade name, Euroairport . It has the peculiarity of being located in binational territory, both Swiss and French. Just for info

The city of Basel has five train stations, three of which are served by several international lines. The Basel CFF train station is connected to the SBB/CFF/FFS network and is served by the TGV and ICE . The  Swiss Basel SBB , and French Bâle SNCF stations are actually in the same complex, separated by Customs and Immigration facilities.   Basel SNCF railway station is served by the French TER trains. The German train station of Baden is part of the DB Network and is served by the DB Regio and the ICE. Basel Badischer Bahnhof is on the opposite side of the city.   In addition to these three major train stations, the city has two other stops served by various regional trains: Basel St-Jean in the direction of Saint-Louis and Mulhouse and Basel-Dreispitz in the direction of Delémont and Porrentruy. More here: SBB Basel train station

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basel

basel

The city of Basel has a dense network of urban and suburban tramways. The first, green-colored, are operated by the company BVB (Basler Verkehrsbetriebe: Public transport Basel); The latter, yellow to red strip, belong to the BLT (Baselland-Transport: transport of Basel-Country, the other half-canton, with that of Basel city).

Today, the 8 urban lines of the BVB and the four suburban routes of the BLT with the four lines of the BLT (lines 10, 11, E11 and 17) also traverse the city by way of the BVB and are therefore urban tramways. Line 10 of the BLT serves the French village of Leymen. The station itself is in French territory and when one leaves the station of Ettingen you can see a sign announcing that you leave Germany, so you go for a few minutes on French soil. The terminus, Rodersdorf, is again in Swiss territory. I was very impressed by the tramways all over the city huge quantity of them, and very clean easy to take. More on them in German (more info) here: BVB tramway schedule in German

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basel gare walking out to city oct13

Some further webpages to help you plan your trip here are

City of Basel on getting around and in

Tourist office of Basel on getting around and in

It is an interesting city and one that needs more visits to fully enjoy it. Hope you enjoy the post on transports in Basel, and can discuss your travels there with me. I now have friends working there and who knows a escape is in order ::)

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

 

 

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