Some streets of Versailles!!!

So in my ongoing efforts to bring you to Versailles as a destination and to help the recent survey of the city of Versailles that claims that 98% of visitors to the city only come to see the castle,pity; let me tell you a bit more about some streets in my beloved Versailles!

The city is a treasure vault of historical, architectural wonders and the best way is to walk it; the city is not big, easily walkable. It might be a bit long but I think is worth telling you about my old home town. So, here are some of the ones I like the most, just the most as all are worth the detour. VERSAILLES! Hint below my neighborhood of old.

Versailles

Rue Colbert. Named after Jean-Baptiste Colbert who was one of the principal ministers of king Louis XIV . He developed the French colonial factories and companies. At  N 1: Hotel de Grammont until 1809.  N  5, Hotel de Villacerf, property at the end of the 19C of Prince Roland Bonaparte.  N 7 former Hotel of Choiseul, then of Villeroy, which housed in 1870-71 the Prussian minister of War and his services.  N 13: Current EDF, (electricity company in France) location of the former hotel of Aumont under the old regime and home of Charles-Frédéric Nepveu, architect of the château under Louis-Philippe, at the end of his life. One of the streets very close to the Castle across from the Royal Chapel.

Versailles

Rue Georges Clemenceau ;  Old rue Saint-Pierre et du  Vermandois in 1684 until the kennel. There was a fountain there.  The name of the French politician , nicknamed “The Tiger” and the “Father of the Victory”, who was president of the Council from 1906 to 1909 and from 1917 to 1920.  The street extends through the place André-Mignot, former Place de la Vénérie-Royale , then the Tribunaux. N  2: Hotel disappeared from the Louveterie (under the reign of Louis XIV).  No. 5 and No. 7: Current Monoprix convenient dept store. At the entrance to the wonderful  passage Saint-Pierre at N 19: Former property of the Lambinet family, (Jean-François was mayor of Versailles in 1848) who gave his name to the museum of the same name and city of Versailles museum located on Avenue de la Reine. This disect the Avenue de Paris and the Avenue de Saint Cloud, and great for shopping at Monoprix! and the Post Office but as you can see nice buildings even here too.

versailles

And closer to home base, this is the Rue Carnot , the former Rue de la Pompe  (pump) name due to the water tower, built in 1665 to No. 7 house which fed at the beginning of the reign of Louis XIV the reservoir of the Cave of Tethys from the pond of Clagny. The pumping was done with a horse wagon ride.  It was later named after the President of the French Republic Sadi Carnot. He was assassinated by the Italian anarchist Santa Geronimo Caserio. At  N  1: Carnot Elementary School. Former Hotel de Noailles, owned by the family of the Marquis de La Fayette’s wife who stayed there. Acquired by the city in 1867. N  2 a false Cellar door with a bird (a magpie).  N  2a  Neoclassical facade. Former property of Antoine Gibus, a hat maker ,from 1862 to 1870 (his name designates a top hat), then more recently René Aubert President of the Académie de Versailles.  No. 5: Stables of King Louis XIV in 1672, then of the Queen and the Dauphine; Prison in the French revolution, then barracks of the Queen’s Quarter and today Court of Appeal of Justice. N  6: Former hotel of the Duc de Bouillon,  N 10: Entrance of the stables of Monsieur, Duke of Orléans (brother of King Louis XIV).  N° 11: Facade of the Pavilion of the Springs (House of the caretakers) built in 1683 with drinking water reservoir for the city. The water was derived from the sources of the towns of Rocquencourt and Chesnay. N  12: Old hotel of Duras and Montmorency, then Bath spa Hotel.  N 40: Former Hôtel de la Roche or Royal Pavilion (family whose members were caretakers of the menagerie).  N 44: Former Café Amaury at the corner of the Avenue de Saint-Cloud, in 1789 place of meeting of the Breton Club (the third State) from where the Club des Jacobins of Paris came out. Find me one, from rue Carnot entering the passage antiques of the rue des Deux Portes!

Versailles rue Carnot to rue de deux portes 2013

Back closer to the castle and one of my favorite street that loved to walked many times is the Rue des Reservoirs . Created in 1672, the old street of the trough located at the entrance of the Rue de la Paroisse. The name of the reservoirs of the castle built in 1685 and now extinct due to the construction of the north wing of the castle. They were located above Madame de Pompadour’s hotel.  At  N  2-4: Hotel of the government (of the Governor of Versailles), former Hotel of Louvois built in 1672, renovated in 1778. Attributed to the Ministry of War in 1834. In 2015, rehabilitation of public offices in private housing.  N 6: Hôtel Ecquevilly  named after the captains of the Hunters of Saint-Germain.  N  7 Hotel of Reservoirs built  at the beginning of the 20C. It replaced the private mansion of Madame de Pompadour and the one in the king’s storage room. The aerial pump of water from the reservoirs was located before 1750 here. It was the Government Hotel from 1765 to 1789 before knowing several owners and being bought by the State in 1934 and assigned to the castle. N  8 former Hotel de Sérent rebuilt.  N 9-11 Hotel du Garde-Meuble de la Couronne (or wardrobe of the Crown) built in 1784 . It housed the prefecture of Seine-et-Oise from 1800 to 1867. Rehabilitation in 2015 in apartments of standing with underground parking. N  13 Théâtre Montansier,(gorgeous a must to see), current Theater Municipal de Versailles, built in 1776 by Mademoiselle de Montansier, founder and director of numerous Parisian theatres (including those of the Palais-Royal and the Variétés).  This courtyard and City Theater was created by Marguerite Brunet, known as “De Montansier” who was the director of performances in the aftermath of the court. It was inaugurated in the presence of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette in 1777. It is distinguished by its entirely round room and its blue and gold decor.  N  16: Hotel of the family of the Trémoïlle (duke of Thouars) put on sale after the French revolution now not well kept. N 19: (at the intersection with the Rue de la Paroisse), building where Ferdinand de Lesseps was born in 1852.  N 21 house where Blaise de Jouvencel lived  former mayor of Versailles.  N  22 Hôtel de Condé where lived and died Jean de La Bruyère  and was born General Gaspard Gourgaud, a memorialist of Napoleon. Now Seventh-day Adventist Church.  N  27: (at the intersection with the Boulevard de la Reine), a building where the painter Henri-Eugène le Sidaner lived .  N 36: Former Hotel Vatel, one of the best restaurants of Versailles in 1900, disappeared in the 1980’s.

Versailles

And this one is hotter still , very close to my home. And a must to walk by as it is close to the Castle but also the Notre Dame market! As well as the historical significant Notre Dame Church (back was my home area!). The Rue de la Paroisse; this one is the one I cross most often at home. Filled with the sandy lands of the summit of the Butte de Montbauron under Louis XIV. At  N 1: Location of the trough removed with the drying of the pond of Clagny from 1770, then land acquired by Soufflot architect of the Pantheon and now the Notre Dame market. N  7a: House of the lawyer Albert Joly in 1869.  N  11: Hotel Pièche from the beginning of the 18C with facade ornaments of the late 19C. Jean-Joseph Pièche was a musician from the King’s chamber. See the dogs seated and the garlands of flowers carved between the windows. He would have seen Rameau and Boucher pass. It was restored between the two wars.  N  3-5-7-7bis-11-21,facades of houses established in the 18C.  N  15 House with the sign of the royal mark in the 18C.  N  32:19C cast-iron balcony guardrail. N  35: Notre-Dame Church created in 1686.  N  37-39-41 former House of the mission of Notre-Dame (1686); Order founded by Saint-Vincent-de-Paul.  N 43: Supposedly the house of Dionis surgeon of Louis XIV.  N 49: House of Félix de Tassy, surgeon of Louis XIV .N  53 Hotel de Bretagne, house of Guy Fagon, surgeon of Louis XIV (or the name of Saint-Côme patron of Surgeons, formerly attributed to this portion of street).  N 63: House at the Grande Fontaine, by the name of Fontaine, the public works contractor who resided there under Louis XIV.  N  79 building with the sign of the Rising Sun. Birth House of the poet Jean-François Ducis.  N  2 and 4 House of the caretakers built under Louis XVI.  At No. 4 lived Joseph-Adrien Le Roi, head of Clinic at the hospice and historian of the Streets of Versailles (1860).  N  6-6 bis 8-10  Hôtel de Saxena: stable of the Dauphine mother of Louis XVI, then Hotel de Berry belonging to the Comte de Provence. N  28: Restaurant of the Comte de Toulouse.  N  32 In 1811, owned by the wife of Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire , zoologist at the Natural History Museum.. No.14 or 15 Location of Madame de Maintenon  charitable home, rebuilt in 1772. N 108: Former property of Jean-Baptiste Farrugia, geographer of the Ministry of War who had the two balconies built in 1783, bearing his initials and the motto “Fidem Fortuna Coronat” or Fortune Rewards Fidelity   N  110, 19C cast iron balcony guardrail.  N  112, in 1734 Auberge Au roi Charlemagne  cabaret in Versailles.

Versailles

And one very popular , we all cross it  walk it and things to do , the grand the beautiful and read some tidbits of it that it will worth your time to pass by and see or go into.  Avenue de Paris, because it went from the castle to the Louvre entering Paris by the Avenue de Versailles approprialy ::)

Avenue de Paris created in 1682, the central axis of the Trident set up by Jules Hardouin-Mansart (Sceaux, Paris, Saint Cloud). One of the widest avenues of France (97 meters). The avenue was planted with a double mail of elms then replaced by sycamore trees due to elm disease.

Versailles

you see at No. 1: Grande Ecurie (stables)  of the king.  Now houses the city’s Archives  open (Consultation room) from Tuesday to Friday from 14h to 17h45 amongst many others see other post.  The reason why it is shown in the Avenue de Paris, as the Petite Ecurie done to the Place d’Armes. N 2 bis: Old Porch (Pullman Hotel) remains of the artillery barracks created by Napoleon III (see the N of Napoleon on the entrance door and the Napoleonic Eagle on the entrance to the  Avenue du General-de-Gaulle). The barracks was destroyed in 1988 to make way for the shopping district of the Les Ménages (where you can buy tickets for the Château).Also, around the  tourist office of Versailles , open from Tuesday to Saturday from 9h to 18h, on Sundays and Mondays from 11h to 17h.  N  3: central Post Office building .  N ° 4 Hôtel de Ville  (city/town hall)  of Versailles, ( a must to visit you can) former hotel of the Princess of Conti (Marie-Anne de Bourbon, daughter of Louis XIV and the Marquise de Lavaliere), and then of the Grand masters of the castle. The lower part overlooking the avenue of General de Gaulle dates from the reign of Louis XIV and was the first city/town hall. The more imposing part, Neo Louis XIII style and overlooking the Avenue de Paris, dated 1897-1900.  The gardens of the city/town hall perpetuate and renew the tradition of the mosaiculture.  N  6: Carved portal of the Hotel des gendarmerie de la garde de Louis XV, built in 1737 , barracks until 1908 and current departmental department of Tax Services restored in 2014. Concentrate in its upper part, mainly around the bull’s eye, the carved decor is made up of military trophy falls (with armour and helmets of wars), garlands of flowers, fins and shells, whose finesse and richness make it a masterpiece of  rocaille stone art. It bears the motto of the gendarmes of the guard of the King: “Quo Jubet iratus Jupiter” or where Jupiter furiously orders.  N 11-13 Prefecture of Versailles (dept government of Yvelines). Succeeding in 1792 at the Vénerie (the King’s hunting kennel) and at the narrow rue des Reservoirs, the former hotel of the department, then prefecture in 1800,  was inaugurated in 1867. The prefecture was occupied in 1870 by the King of Prussia and his staff, then by Adolphe Thiers, Mac-Mahon and Jules Grevy as hotel of the Presidency of the French Republic until 1879. The prefecture and the Yvelines General Council have been occupying the premises since 1880.  N  15: School of Music founded by Emile Cousin in 1878 (then transferred to Rue de Jouvencel).  N 19: Police hotel in place of the old monumental stables of the Countess du Barry mistress of Louis XV, built in 1772, then owned by the Comte de Provence brother of Louis XVI , and himself later Louis XVIII, who changed them with the architect J. Chalgrin . The buildings housed the lancers of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard who were killed in Waterloo, then the Montbauron barracks. They are now home to the police station. N  21: The old hotel of the Countess du Barry, built in 1751, and today Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Val d’Oise (95) and Yvelines(78) since 1937.

Versailles

N ° 22 the hotel Menus Plaisirs. This hotel was raised by Louis XV and occupied by the administration of the Menus-Plaisirs between 1739 and 1745. It housed the workshops of sets and the material of the Games and shows related to the festivities of the King and the court. A provisional room hosted the assembly of Notables in 1787-88, and finally the deputies summoned to the States General on May 5, 1789 by the King. It was in this room that the abolition of privileges and the declaration of Human and Citizen Rights were voted on. It was bought and demolished in 1800. The hotel became a cavalry barracks, then the technical services of the city were lodged from 1942 to 1988. Since 1987, it houses the Center of Baroque Music of Versailles which produces concerts and shows in France and abroad and brings together a research center and a singing school.  Go up the stairs to the bottom of the courtyard to discover the location of the room of the General States. On the right pillar of the entrance Avenue de Paris the elevation of the place at 130 meters is carved into the stone.  No. 28: Prison for women. It was installed in 1789 at the site of a former boarding school built in 1750. Then the state bought it in 1857 and enlarged the place in 1860.  The prison for men is located in Bois D’Arcy since 1980.   N  31: Lycée Jean-de-la-Bruyère, (high school) named after the moralistic writer who died in Versailles in 1696. It was named in 1962.  In 1880, Miss Arnaud created a secular school for girls at this site (on land formerly belonging to the Countess du Barry), which became municipal and then owned by the state in 1906.  N 38-40: Chamber of Notaries. Hotel of the time of Louis XVI.  N 63 Pavillon de Provence, former residence of Monsieur, brother of the king and king Louis XVIII was born here. From 1922 to 1940, the abode housed the eastern Normal School of Daughters of the Universal Israelite Alliance. From 1946 to 1962, it was taken over by the children’s relief work and welcomed Elie Wiesel, the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.  N 68: Convent of Solitude belonging to the Sisters of Notre-Dame du Cénacle. This building associated with an English park of the late 17C, reworked in the 19C, belonged to the Earl of Vergennes, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Louis XVI from 1775 to 1787.  N  70: Lycée Marie Curie, (high school) named after the French physicist and chemist, of Polish origin, who received twice the Nobel Prize for her research on radiation and radium in 1903 and 1911. N  73 Domaine de Madame Elizabeth. Owned by the community of Célestins monks, having been redeemed and built by the Prince and Princess of Rohan-Guéméné, then by Louis XVI, it was given as a gift to his sister who was later guillotined in 1792. Manufacture of watchmaking at the French revolution.  The Yvelines General Council bought it in 1983 as well as the Orangerie in 1997.  In 2016, the park designed in the English way before the revolution, allows to appreciate a remarkable collection of native and exotic forest species such as American oak, purple beech, lime tree, sycamore trees etc, a garden of aromatic plants and demonstrations of permaculture and a pet park. N  89 Reliefs above the door of the Vauban School, made in 1957; They represent Le Nôtre and Vauban.  N 90 bis: Old ponds where the stream of Madame Elisabeth’s English park was poured. Then replaced by a rose garden in the Truffaut nurseries, then by the residence of the Roseraie.

Versailles

Versailles

At N 93: Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac , one of the personalities of the Literary and Social Society of the late 19C, was a tenant from 1894. In particular, he received Marcel Proust and Sarah Bernhardt.  N  107: Maison Saint-Joseph.  N  109-109 bis: Congregation of the Servant Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.  N  111 Parc Chauchard with the picturesque and vast music pavilion of Madame, Countess of Provence, sister-in-law of Louis XVI and wife of Louis XVIII, built around 1780. This pavilion is associated with a small enclosed rectangular garden at the end of which is the statue of Alfred Chauchard. Madame’s park was cut in two in the French revolution, one that later became the Lycée Sainte-Geneviève (1913 high school), the other for several successive owners, including the last Alfred Chauchard, founder of the department stores of the Louvre in Paris, which was the place for his most deserving workers who became owners in 1902.  At the entrance to the street you have two pavilions of the Grille d’Octroi or passage of taxes  of neoclassical architecture, set up in 1824 and  were closed in 1943. The right-hand building on the way to Paris was reserved for the caretakers and the left to collect the rights to the goods brought into the city. Around it you have the square or Place Louis XIV, and here finishes the Avenue de Paris on the edge of the town of Viroflay.

Versailles

So here is a little bit of my beloved Versailles, a town full of history of France and the world, that needs more personal and up close attention by you all. Like I said, Versailles is a lot more than the castle!

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers to all!!!

ps. And I say goodbye for a week on business assignment in Asia: cheers!

 

 

2 Comments to “Some streets of Versailles!!!”

  1. We spent 3 days in Versailles and, although our main reason for being there was to visit the palace, we loved cycling down the avenue and side streets and also enjoyed long walks on the nearby woods, commanding great views of the surrounding area. It is a beautiful and very interesting town. 👍

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: