The land of discoveries, come back to Trujillo!

A few years back, I had gone to many not all places of my beloved Spain, and someone was to meet me for business. I was open to suggestions and as the person was from the area ,I was taken to Trujillo; a find. I have already know the city from my Spanish history,but never been to the town. This was the opportunity.

Trujillo  is in the Province of Caceres in the autonomous community of Extremadura on the west of Spain. The town contains many medieval and renaissance buildings and on many of them were built or enriched by conquerors of the new world. These include, Francisco Pizarro, the conqueror of Peru as well as his brothers Francisco de Orellana, and Hernando de Alarcon.

My previous blog post on Trujillo is here: https://paris1972-versailles2003.com/2012/09/22/trujillo-extremadura-birthplace-of-conquerors-and-more/

A bit of history I like

Since Roman times the town was known as  Turgalium  and became a prefecture stipendiary of the Lusitanian capital,Emerita Augusta (today is Mérida).  With the Muslim invasion and conquest in 711, it became one of the main towns in the region  renamed Turjalah, governed by the Taifa based in Madrid. This taifa was subject to the Umayyad Emirate and the subsequent Caliphate ruled until the middle of the 11C. Five centuries of Muslim occupation and control finally ended when an army formed by forces of the Military orders and the Bishop of Plasencia laid siege to the city of Trujillo with the support and blessing of Saint Fernando III (king).

The town was finally captured in 1232. During the final assault, according to the local legend, the Christian forces were faltering just short of victory when many reported seeing the Virgin Mary (known as Virgen de la Victoria or the Virgin Mary of Victory) between the two towers, or Arco del Triunfo, in the castle. Sufficiently inspired, Christian troops pressed on and achieved victory defeating the Muslims who were inside.  King Juan II of Castile gave the town the title of city in 1430.

During the War of Independence (from Napoleon’s France), one of the first authorities that responded to the call of the  Junta of Mostoles in May 1808 was the mayor of Trujillo, Antonio Martin Rivas who prepared enlistments of volunteers, with food and arms, plus the mobilization of troops, to go to the aid of the Junta. Trujillo was captured by the French in 1811 and held until 1812.

Some things to see here are

The Castle (Alcazaba), the Church of Santiago, the Church of Santa María la Mayor, the Church of San Francisco, the Church of San Martín, the Plaza Mayor, and renaissance palaces such as the palace of the Marquis of the Conquest, the palace of the Orellana-Pizarro family, the palace of the Duques de San Carlos, Marquesado de Piedras Albas, the house of the  Palace Chaves , and of course the walled old town.

Trujillo

The Palacio de Piedras Albas was built circa 1530 ,formely owned by the Marquis de Orellana and later by the Marquis de San Juan de Piedras Albas. It has several museums: Museum of Coria (Javier Salas Foundation), Pizzaro’s House, Enrique Elías Museum (local designer), Museum of Cheese and Wine.

Overall, all is around the Plaza Mayor, and very nice indeed, as main squares in Spain goes it can rank up there, and the historical building around it are just worth at least a day here.

Trujillo

Some webpages to help you trip planning are

Extremadura tourist office on Trujillo : http://www.turismoextremadura.com/viajar/turismo/en/explora/Trujillo-00001/

Tourist office of Trujillo; http://www.trujillo.es/monumentos/iglesia-de-santa-maria-la-mayor/

Parador de Trujillo: http://www.parador.es/en/paradores/parador-de-Trujillo

There you go not bad after all, and the needs as usual to come back to these beautiful places of my beloved Spain. Trujillo is on the list. Hope you enjoy the post and give you something to come for a visit.It is worth it.

And remember, happy travels, good health, and many cheers!!!

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2 Comments to “The land of discoveries, come back to Trujillo!”

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